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DREAMER STORY

Eric K. Needs DACA To Continue Teaching

DREAMER STORY

Eric K. Needs DACA To Continue Teaching

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I teach the kids socioemotional skills, cognitive skills — of course along with academic content like language, literacy, math. To be completely honest, I think I bring belief to them. I know that sounds tacky, corny, and cheesy almost, but I think it’s the truth. A lot of these kids don’t really have the opportunity to grow into something that they want to be. They’re little kids, I think they deserve a fair chance in the world. And I think I bring that belief for the kids and I think that’s the most impactful thing I do for them.

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Eric K.

Teacher

I’ve been there for a year now and I feel like I’m a part of the community. It’s a preschool, so half of the students are left from the past year. I’ve known these kids for a year now. They would lose a person they’ve know for a third of their lives and I think that’s a big deal for them, for a community that’s impoverished, that doesn’t have much. It would be devastating for them.

DACA was kind of like a dream come true. The right to work — that was huge. I mean, I can do anything, pretty much, with the right to work. I can work for food and for rent. I can at least live. So, I think that was, now that I think about it, the greatest news of my life.

When you’re revoking DACA you’re taking away the right to basically live. The right to work is a basic necessity in life. You don’t have the right to work, you don’t get to do anything. That’s 800,000 lives that you’re taking away… You really have to look at the human behind the number. That person breathes, lives, and eats, and talks and has fun with people, and you know, gets angry, gets sad. You are plucking people away and you’re damaging society.

"That’s 800,000 lives that you’re taking away… You really have to look at the human behind the number."