The 7 Questions That Trump and Cruz Need to Answer on Immigration

Posted on 04/29/2016

With California’s primary looming, national Republicans should remember – with existential fear for their political future – the lessons of 20 years ago, when then-Governor Pete Wilson pushed through the anti-immigrant Prop 187. While its provisions may seem sadly tame next to Trump and Cruz’s proposals for the mass deportation of over 11 million people, we think it’s instructive on the astronomical political cost that will come to those in the national GOP who do not forcefully reject these awful and immigration “plans.”

That’s why we made this video – The Trump Effect – on the terrible price the GOP will pay for following the Cruz and Trump proposals.

Second, instead of asking Donald Trump about the wall for the thousandth time, here’s seven questions that Trump or Cruz actually owe the American public answers on:

 

  1. How exactly do you plan to pay for the mass deportation of approximately 11 million undocumented people already living here?

  2. Do you believe the Supreme Court was correct to rule that children should be allowed access to America’s public schools, regardless of their status? Would you take steps to eliminate taxpayer dollars for educating undocumented minors?

  3. Since we know which communities across the U.S. have large undocumented student and family populations, would you use these elementary schools as a starting point to start rounding up undocumented kids?

  4. Do you believe that hospitals should deny medical care to those individuals without proper immigration documentation?

  5. You have said you do not believe the 14th Amendment grants citizenship to people you label as “anchor babies.” What is your plan for those children? Do they get deported as well? Or do we leave them in the U.S. and effectively orphan the roughly 3 million native born U.S. citizens who would be left behind?

  6. For Trump – You have refused to denounce the internment camps used during World War II, and your current plan would involve nearly 100 times as many people as those locked away during that period. If you’re arresting and deporting roughly 21,000 people every single day for 18 months, will you build new internment camps?

  7. For Cruz – Although you said you don’t want a specific “deportation force,” your plan states that over 800,000 law enforcement officers would become immigration enforcement police. What sort of daily interactions should the American public expect with the 800,000 law enforcement officers who are now tasked with ensuring that every person with whom they interact is here lawfully?

 

As long as Trump and Cruz continue promising to arrest and deport 11 million individuals already living here, American voters deserve straight answers to these questions from the candidates.

SCHULTE: Even Before Polls Close, We’re Already Confident What Results Will Show

Posted by Todd Schulte on 04/26/2016

Rather than wait until the polls close, and we see yet another round of exit polls, we decided to send out our release now – because we’re that confident that once again, a strong majority of Republican primary voters (not just Americans or Republicans, but Republican primary voters) reject the Trump and Cruz “plans” for rounding up and deporting 11 million undocumented immigrants and, instead, support a path to legalization.

So here’s our press release ahead of time:

(Washington DC) – Even though polls are still hours from closing – here’s our statement on what you can expect from tonight’s five Republican presidential primaries:

“When it comes to the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently living in the United States, a majority of Republican primary voters support legalization over mass deportation – time and time again in virtually every primary contest this election cycle. Every single time, Republican primary voters reject mass deportation in favor of legal status, and we’re willing to bet confidently that tonight’s results will be no different.”

This is not just a majority of swing voters, Latinos, and Asian-Americans who reject these terrible “plans” from Trump and Cruz – it is GOP primary voters as well.

No matter which GOP candidate wins each contest this evening, tonight’s results are almost certain to be consistent with earlier Republican contests that have already taken place this election cycle:

New York Republican primary voters:

60% favor a path to legalization vs. 36% who favor mass deportation

Wisconsin Republican Primary voters:

60% favor a path to legalization vs. 33% who favor mass deportation

Virginia Republican primary voters:

59% favor a path to legalization vs. 36% who favor mass deportation

Michigan Republican primary voters:

56% favor a path to legalization vs. 37% who favor mass deportation

New Hampshire Republican primary voters:

56% favor a path to legalization vs. 41% who favor mass deportation

Illinois Republican primary voters:

56% favor a path to legalization vs. 40% who favor mass deportation

Florida Republican primary voters:

55% favor a path to legalization vs. 35% who favor mass deportation

Missouri Republican primary voters:

54% favor a path to legalization vs. 42% who favor mass deportation

Ohio Republican primary voters:

54% favor a path to legalization vs. 39% who favor mass deportation

South Carolina Republican primary voters:

53% favor a path to legalization vs. 44% who favor mass deportation

TriBeCa Premiere of Immigration Documentary: 'Free Like The Birds'

Posted on 04/25/2016

TriBeCa Film Festival immigrationOn Thursday, activists, influencers, and celebrities headed to New York City for the world premiere of documentary short Free Like The Birds and a trio of panels on immigration at the TriBeCa Film Festival. Directed by Paola Mendoza, the film is a powerful, intimate take on the current state of immigration in the U.S. presented through the story of the Cruzes, a mixed status family that would benefit from Deferred Action for Parents of Americans. It also tells the rise of young Sophie Cruz as the Fight for Families movement’s six-year-old muse – a feisty and optimistic fighter, determined to keep her family, and millions of other families, together.

TriBeCa Immigration

The members of the Cruz family have become outspoken activists in the push for the implementation of President Obama’s 2014 executive actions. When, last summer, Pope Francis visited Washington D.C., Sophie broke through the barriers lining the sidewalks to hand him a letter, its contents asking for him to help keep her family together and her parents safe from deportation. Sophie and her little sister are both U.S. citizens. Their citizenship makes their parents, who are undocumented Mexican immigrants who have been contributing to the country for many years, eligible for DAPA.

Thursday night’s showing was the first time that the Cruz family saw the documentary. The film received tears as well as powerful applause. The audience was emotional; one can only imagine how the Cruz family felt watching their lives’ story retold on the screen before them.

Post-premiere panels included filmmaker Cary Fukunaga, director Paola Mendoza, FWD.us president Todd Schulte, and actress and activist Rosie Perez.

“Sophie is the living spirit [of the fight for immigration reform]. A child that has the nerve and audacity to run through the line and tell the Pope, ‘see me and see my fight,'” said Perez of Sophie’s role in the fight for reform.

TriBeCa Immigration

On a panel featuring moderator Adrian Carrasquillo of Buzzfeed and the Cruz family, Carrasquillo asked Sophie what she hoped for her family’s future. The six-year-old responded: “My dream is for my parents to get an immigration reform so they can see their parents because they need hugs and love.”

It’s a similar message to the one she shared on Monday, speaking [while hoisted up in front of the microphone by her father] to a crowd of 5,000 immigrants, families, and supporters in front of the Supreme Court. Early last week, the Cruzes were in Washington D.C. fighting alongside immigrant families at the Supreme Court hearing of U.S. v. Texas. Sophie and her mother were among the few members of the public allowed to enter the court for the arguments, their presence representative of the five million people and families who would be impacted by Expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and DAPA. The futures of the two programs, which were parts of President Obama’s 2014 executive actions on immigration, will be determined in the ruling on the case.

The Cruz family seems to take in these events – the rally, the TriBeCa premiere, and panel – one moment at a time. They are more opportunities to share their story– a story that resonates with the 10 million people who live in a household with someone who would be impacted by Expanded DACA and DAPA. Yet unbeknownst to them, the Cruz family is changing the rhetoric and courageously putting a face to the movement. 

Watch Free Like The Birds below and share to show your support of the Cruz family, DAPA, and the expansion of DACA:

State after State, Republican Primary Voters Overwhelmingly Support Path to Legalization

Posted on 04/19/2016

Washington DC – Following tonight’s New York Republican presidential primary, FWD.us President Todd Schulte made the following statement:

“While Carl Paladino’s anti-immigrant policies in 2010 might not have been quite as quick to demand the full expulsion of every single undocumented immigrant as Donald Trump’s, his electoral success in a general election provides a helpful historical predictor for this fall.”

Tonight’s results show:

New York Republican primary voters:

60% favor a path to legalization vs. 36% who favor mass deportation

Tonight’s results are consistent with results from earlier Republican contests:

Wisconsin Republican Primary Voters:

60% favor a path to legalization vs. 33% who favor mass deportation

Florida Republican primary Voters:

55% favor a path to legalization vs. 35% who favor mass deportation

Ohio Republican primary Voters:

54% favor a path to legalization vs. 39% who favor mass deportation

Illinois Republican primary Voters:

56% favor a path to legalization vs. 40% who favor mass deportation

Missouri Republican primary Voters:

54% favor a path to legalization vs. 42% who favor mass deportation

South Carolina Republican primary Voters:

53% favor a path to legalization vs. 44% who favor mass deportation

New Hampshire Republican primary Voters:

56% favor a path to legalization vs. 41% who favor mass deportation

Virginia Republican primary Voters:

59% favor a path to legalization vs. 36% who favor mass deportation

Michigan Republican  primary Voters:

56% favor a path to legalization vs. 37% who favor mass deportation